Four Culturelle product boxes

Recommend the proven probiotic

Culturelle® is the only probiotic that contains 100% Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG®)—the proven effective probiotic strain.1

LGG® is safe and has been extensively studied

Culturelle® products include live LGG® - a unique strain of probiotic that’s naturally sourced and scientifically proven to work in harmony with the human body.* With over 1,000 scientific studies and over 200 human clinical trials, LGG® has been more extensively studied than any other probiotic strain and proven safe and effective with demonstrated digestive and immune benefits for adult, child, and infant patients.2-10

Culturelle® is exclusively powered by LGG®

An ideal candidate for study because of its ability to survive stomach acid and bile, adhere to human intestinal epithelial cells, and produce an antimicrobial substance, LGG®, has been completely sequenced—revealing over 300 strain-specific proteins. It is these strain-specific proteins that give rise to the unique features of LGG® as a probiotic.11

Mechanisms of action for LGG® include interference with enteropathogen colonization through competition as well as secretion of antibacterial substances, stimulation of bowel epithelial cell proliferation, and production of protective mucins.3,12-13  Physiologically, this translates into improved epithelial barrier function delivered by LGG®. The epithelial barrier is exposed to a broad spectrum of substances and organisms and is a critical control point for good health and appropriate immune responses. 

This extensive research has yielded a variety of outcomes including immune support and gastrointestinal benefits.2-9,14-19 Other demonstrated benefits include acute diarrhea20-21, antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD)22-24 and C. difficile induced colitis.25-26
 
Taking together the hundreds of clinical trials in healthy and vulnerable populations including adults, children and infants, the totality of evidence indicates LGG® is both safe and effective. 

LGG®: satisfies all requirements of an ideal probiotic

Scientific research has established the requirements for microbiota supplementation to qualify as an ideal probiotic and clinical research has further established safety and efficacy for several well studied strains.2, 27        

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Potential benefits of a probiotic strain should be indicated at a given dose based on clinical studies. The clinical evidence for probiotics boasting high colony-forming units (CFUs) or multiple strains is largely unsupported. LGG® meets all requirements.

The Superior Quality Probiotic

Considered the premier probiotic in the world, LGG® is strong enough, sticky enough and fertile enough to survive stomach acids and set up shop in the intestines.*

Purity and Potency 

Culturelle® certifies that our products meet the highest standards of purity and potency. Unlike some products which measure the number of probiotics cultures at the time of manufacture, Culturelle® guarantees the stated number of live naturally sourced LGG® cultures through the expiration date on the box.

For a probiotic to provide optimal outcomes, it needs to survive and thrive. Each serving of Culturelle® probiotic is individually packaged and protected to ensure the survivability of our probiotic without the need for refrigeration. Capsules are individually sealed and given a mini atmosphere to prevent moisture, light, heat and air from getting in. This allows the product to be shelf-stable and require no refrigeration, while keeping our probiotic fresh and viable.

LGG Quality Standards

  • Produced according to FDA Current Good Manufacturing Practices
  • FDA-evaluated strain identity 
  • Packaged to ensure product viability
  • Each product lot inspected and reviewed for conformance
  • Quality systems audited regularly by the NSF to maintain our NSF certification
References
    • Data on File. I-Health Inc, Cromwell, CT.
    • Gogineni VK, Lee E Morrow and Mark,A.Malesker. Probiotics: Mechanisms of action and clinical application. Journal of Probiotics & Health. 2013(1):1-11.
    • Segers ME, Lebeer S. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG - host interactions. Microbial Cell Factories. 2014;13(Suppl 1):S7-S23.
    • Davidson LE, Fiorino AM, Snydman DR, Hibberd PL. Lactobacillus GG as an immune adjuvant for live-attenuated influenza vaccine in healthy adults: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011;65(4):501-507.
    • Siitonen S, Vapaatalo H, Salminen S, et al. Effect of Lactobacillus GG yoghurt in prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhoea. Ann Med. 1990;22(1):57-59.
    • Vanderhoof JA, Whitney DB, Antonson DL, et al. Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children.J Pediatr. 1999;135:564-568.
    • Guandalini S, Pensabene L, Zikri MA, et al: Lactobacillus GG administered in oral rehydration solution to children with acute diarrhea: a multicenter European trial. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2000 30(1):54–60.
    • Kalliomäki M, Salminen S, Poussa T, Arvilommi H, Isolauri E. Probiotics during the first 7 years of life: a cumulative risk reduction of eczema in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(4):1019-1021.
    • Berni Canani R, Nocerino R, Terrin G, et al. Effect of Lactobacillus GG on tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy: a randomized trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;129(2):580-602.
    • Mack DR, Michail S, Wei S, McDougall L, Hollingsworth MA. Probiotics inhibit enteropathogenic E. coli adherence in vitro by inducing intestinal mucingene expression. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 1999;276(4 39-4):G941-G950.
    • Reunanen J, von Ossowski I, Hendrickx A, Palva A, de Vos W.  Characterization of the SpaCBA pilus fibers in the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.  Appl & Environ Microbiol. 2012;28(7):2337-2344.
    • Segers ME, Lebeer S. Towards a better understanding of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG - host interactions. Microbial Cell Factories. 2014;13(Suppl 1):S7-S23.
    • Gogineni VK, Lee E Morrow and Mark,A.Malesker. Probiotics: Mechanisms of action and clinical application. Journal of Probiotics & Health. 2013(1):1-11.
    • Mack DR, Ahrne S, Hyde L, Wei S, Hollingsworth MA. Extracellular MUC3 mucin secretion follows adherence of lactobacillus strains to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. Gut. 2003;52(6):827-833.
    • Isolauri E, Joensuu J, Suomalainen H, Luomala M, Vesikari T. Improved immunogenicity of oral D xRRV reassortant rotavirus vaccine by Lactobacillus casei GG. Vaccine. 1995;13(3):310-312.
    • Kumpu M, Kekkonen RA, Kautiainen H, et al. Milk containing probiotic lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and respiratory illness in children: A randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2012;66(9):1020-1023.
    • Malin M, Verronen P, Korhonen H, et al. Dietary therapy with lactobacillus GG, bovine colostrum or bovine immune colostrum in patients with juvenile chronic arthritis: Evaluation of effect on gut defense mechanisms. INFLAMMOPHARMACOLOGY. 1997;5(3):219-236.
    • Davidson LE, Fiorino AM, Snydman DR, Hibberd PL. Lactobacillus GG as an immune adjuvant for live-attenuated influenza vaccine in healthy adults: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011;65(4):501-507.
    • Kalliomäki M, Salminen S, Poussa T, Arvilommi H, Isolauri E. Probiotics during the first 7 years of life: a cumulative risk reduction of eczema in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007;119(4):1019-1021.
    • Berni Canani R, Nocerino R, Terrin G, et al. Effect of Lactobacillus GG on tolerance acquisition in infants with cow's milk allergy: a randomized trial. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;129(2):580-602.
    • Kaila M, Isolauri E, Saxelin M, Arvilommi H, Vesikari T. Viable versus inactivated lactobacillus strain GG in acute rotavirus diarrhea. Arch Dis Child. 1995;72(1):51-53.
    • Guandalini S, Pensabene L, Zikri MA, et al: Lactobacillus GG administered in oral rehydration solution to children with acute diarrhea: a multicenter European trial. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2000 30(1):54–60.
    • Arvola T, Laiho K, Torkkeli S, et al. Prophylactic lactobacillus GG reduces antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children with respiratory infections: A randomized study. Pediatrics. 1999;104(5):e64.
    • Siitonen S, Vapaatalo H, Salminen S, et al. Effect of Lactobacillus GG yoghurt in prevention of antibiotic associated diarrhea. Ann Med. 1990;22(1):57-59.
    • Vanderhoof JA, Whitney DB, Antonson DL, et al. Lactobacillus GG in the prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in children.J Pediatr. 1999;135:564-568.
    • Gorbach SL, Chang TW, Goldin B. Successful treatment of relapsing clostridium difficile colitis with lactobacillus GG. Lancet. 1987;2(8574):1519.  
    • Bennett R, Gorbach S, Goldin B, et al. Treatment of relapsing clostridium difficile diarrhea with lactobacillus GG. Nutrition Today Supplement.1996;31(6):35S. 
    • Saxelin M, Lassig A, Karjalainen H, et al. Persistence of probiotic strains in the gastrointestinal tract when administered as capsules, yoghurt, or cheese. Int J Food Microbiol. 2010;144(2):293-300.